National Young Farmers Conference review

Tierney, Chandler, Becky @ Stone Barns

What with moving into a new house and starting a new job and navigating a new bike commute, I haven’t had time yet to write part 2 of my canning saga.  My writing energy this last week went into the following writeup for the  Washington Tilth Producers quarterly newsletter.  I don’t know if this will get published or not, but what came out when I sat down to write about the conference is worth posting here.

My Experience at the 2010 National Young Farmers Conference

by Becky Warner

In thinking about writing a summary of the National Young Farmers Conference that I attended in New York in the first week of December, I keep coming back to an image of what a “conference” looked like at my pre-farming job, which was in computer software development.  A tech conference is almost always held in Las Vegas in a massive, sterile event center.  Time is spent schmoozing and selling product.  Food is ample but tends toward large pieces of tough meat surrounded by mysterious high school cafeteria-style glop.  Attendees are there on their company’s dime and they make the most of it, spending lavishly on first-class flights, five star hotels, and limousine rides.

Attending the National Young Farmers Conference at Stone Barns Center for Food and Agriculture could not have been a bigger contrast.  The venue was an idyllic piece of farmland in New York’s Westchester County, where beautifully crafted old fieldstone buildings have been modernized into warm-feeling workshop spaces and animals graze in the surrounding pastures.  The meals we ate in the vaulted hayloft-turned-lecture-hall were catered by the amazing farm-to-table restuarant Blue Hill at Stone Barns, and were freshly crafted from organic ingredients grown on the farm where we sat.

Perhaps the most striking difference was the attitude of the young farmers attending the conference.  There was a large group of us doing work-exchange for the conference and being a member of that group really hit home a point for me.  I’ll see if I can explain it.

In exchange for housing, meals, and part of the conference admission fee, we work-traders helped set up and serve the meals, and we were in charge of taking “official” notes and  audio recordings of the workshops we attended.  As a result, I got to know the staff/organizers at Stone Barns, saw a bit of the behind-the-scenes, and felt that I was an integral part of the event rather than just an attendee.  It made it feel really meaningful.

I gleaned a lot of information and inspiration out of the conference.  The keynote speeches by Kathleen Merrigan (US Deputy Secretary of Agriculture) and Bill and Nicolette Niman (Niman Ranch) were thought-provoking.  I attended seven workshops with wide-ranging topics such as crop rotation planning, do-it-yourself techniques, building a successful CSA, growing better starts in the greenhouse, and Farm Bill policy for beginners.  All were well-presented and full of useful information.  There were a multitude of other options that I didn’t have time for, including permaculture workshops, a hog butchering demo, and instruction in worksongs.

I was able to attend the conference and gain all these great bits of knowledge to add to my farming toolbox because someone or some entity was generous enough to provide part of the financial support to cover my being there.  In return, I was able to help out by doing work-trade: doing something for free that otherwise, someone would have been paid to do.  In this way, everybody wins and there is less waste in the system.

I feel that this is a small example of the way that the young farmer movement as a whole can work and is working.  Every young farmer there at the conference, whether they were doing work trade or not, is in the same position: We don’t have much money but we are passionate and hardworking.  We don’t expect to have things handed to us, but instead we want to work together with our compatriots and those who have the means to help us.  We can’t approach a problem by simply throwing money at it, like they often seem to do in the tech world.  Instead we have to work smarter to achieve results by making the best use of resources we do have and relying on mutual cooperation with friends and strangers.

There are those out there who want to help us get a leg up — mentors who are willing to share knowledge, give of their time and let us borrow their tools; organizations who can provide educational scholarships, financial loans, etc. But we have to put in the effort to search out these opportunities and make the most of them.  We have to show that we are willing to work-trade for them.

Young farmers, let’s continue to push the momentum of the food revolution that is happening in America today.  We are a part of something important.  We have lofty aspirations, and we can make them realities by living thoughtfully, sticking by our ideals, growing good food, and staying involved in our communities.  Attending the 2010 National Young Farmer Conference helped me see more clearly that we what we are doing here in Washington state is part of a real and growing movement across the country — I feel privileged to be a part of it and am excited to see what develops as we move into 2011.

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One Response

  1. Bex:
    WOW!!! What an experience for you to be a part of…. Congratulations and continued success in whatever and wherever you tackle anything!
    (With tongue in cheek) I was kind of sad to see that you missed the hog butchering demo. Maybe you can catch up with it next year…

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